DOES YOUR DOG Gnaw EVERYTHING IT FINDS?

DOES YOUR DOG Gnaw EVERYTHING IT FINDS?

When you come home from outside, if you see that your little friend has gnawed everything in front of him from slippers to furniture upholstery in a few hours and this action is repeated every time your dog is alone, increasing the size of the damage, I recommend you to consider my solution suggestions for you in this article.
Why Do Dogs Gnaw?
The first thing you need to know is to understand the reason before solving this action. Chewing is a natural behavior for all dogs. There are various reasons for this. Puppies in particular use their mouths as a tool to explore the world. Just like babies, puppies chew on objects they can reach, and this action not only makes teething easier, it also relieves toothache, but also helps their gums relax.
A dog gets its permanent teeth in approximately 4 to 6 months. If the gnawing behavior continues after this period, it means that different factors have come into play. Your dog may be nibbling out of boredom, out of habit, or stress-induced gnawing if left alone. The key to preventing gnawing is to identify the cause of this behavior.
 
How to Stop Your Dog's Gnawing Habit
Understand your dog. First, observe why it might be gnawing.
Buy your dog chew toys that he can chew with pleasure. Direct it to chew toys or artificial bones made of calfskin that you want to gnaw, especially during the teething period. Remember that you can direct the habits your dog will acquire.
Take precautions. Household cleaning supplies, some potted flowers, and cables pose a serious threat to your puppy's health. Design these objects out of your dog's reach or leave them out. shoes, socks etc. Remove all objects that might encourage your dog to chew, such as when he is alone.
If your dog is gnawing at various objects in your home every time he is alone, it is probably due to boredom. Play regularly with your dog every day and do not neglect your daily exercises. Exhaust your dog mentally and physically before leaving it alone at home. Remember, the best dog is a tired dog.
Practice the right discipline. When your dog bites into an object you don't want him to gnaw on, a firm "No!" Warn him with the command and replace the object with a toy that he can gnaw. Reward verbally by praising him when he starts to gnaw on the appropriate toy or bone.
Be consistent. Your dog cannot distinguish between the slipper you allow to gnaw and the slipper you do not allow. Prohibitions must apply to every same object.
A late penalty is not a penalty. Reacting to the mischief he did while you were not at home, and shouting and shouting after hours will not give your dog a message other than that he should be afraid of you in an ordinary moment. Penalties and warnings apply at the time of the action. Your dog can't relate what he did an hour or two ago to your yelling at him.
You can spray anti-gnawing spray or apply bitter pickle juice to floors such as walls and door edges as a deterrent.
 
In summary;
Gnawing is a natural behavior for dogs. All dogs bite, not just your dog.
Before solving the problem, you must solve the cause.
Always have suitable chew toys available for your dog.
Guide your dog from objects you do not want to gnaw to objects you want to gnaw.
Eliminate objects that he can reach when left alone. (Slippers, remote control, etc.)
Make sure your dog meets his mental and physical exercise needs.